30 March 2008

4:22 PM - 2 comments

Condi Baby

my family is having our usual sunday pow wow
one sister lives in the Indiana- Midwest,
another lives in Jersey- East
the oldest lives in Oregon- Northwest
and I'm in Texas- South
then we connect the parents in Nigeria and try and catch up with what is going on with everybody and of course debate the latest CNN polling data.

So this is where we are

What happens is McCain picks Condi Rice as his running mate?
How does this affect the democratic party and 2009's future president??

So yeah, let's just say with 5 people on the phone we had 6 positions
So what do you think

24 March 2008

1:03 AM - 1 comment

Citizenship by death

A young, ambitious immigrant from Guatemala who dreamed of becoming an architect.
A Nigerian medic.
A soldier from China who boasted he would one day become an American general.

United by this simple phrase
American by death.

I wish i could say more but as we hit an ominous milestone in Iraq.
4000 dead
Let us not forget that some died protecting those who treat them as second class citizens
Let us not forget that some died trying to protect a country that was not their own.
Let us not forget that some died defending a freedom that was denied them.
Let us not forget that some died illegal immigrants because of laws.


Let us not forget that these Americans by death were aliens for life.

Let us not forget.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080324/ap_on_re_us/4000_fallen_citizens_in_death;_ylt=AuIf02gVFti5B20CsCF6eGIUewgF

20 March 2008

1:12 AM - 3 comments

OBAMA SPEECH PART 1

We the people, in order to form a more perfect union.
Two hundred and twenty one years ago, in a hall that still stands across the street, a group of men gathered and, with these simple words, launched America’s improbable experiment in democracy. Farmers and scholars; statesmen and patriots who had traveled across an ocean to escape tyranny and persecution finally made real their declaration of independence at a Philadelphia convention that lasted through the spring of 1787. The document they produced was eventually signed but ultimately unfinished. It was stained by this nation original sin of slavery, a question that divided the colonies and brought the convention to a stalemate until the founders chose to allow the slave trade to continue for at least twenty more years, and to leave any final resolution to future generations. Of course, the answer to the slavery question was already embedded within our Constitution – a Constitution that had at is very core the ideal of equal citizenship under the law; a Constitution that promised its people liberty, and justice, and a union that could be and should be perfected over time. And yet words on a parchment would not be enough to deliver slaves from bondage, or provide men and women of every color and creed their full rights and obligations as citizens of the United States. What would be needed were Americans in successive generations who were willing to do their part – through protests and struggle, on the streets and in the courts, through a civil war and civil disobedience and always at great risk - to narrow that gap between the promise of our ideals and the reality of their time. This was one of the tasks we set forth at the beginning of this campaign – to continue the long march of those who came before us, a march for a more just, more equal, more free, more caring and more prosperous America. I chose to run for the presidency at this moment in history because I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction – towards a better future for of children and our grandchildren. This belief comes from my unyielding faith in the decency and generosity of the American people. But it also comes from my own American story. I am the son of a black man from Kenya and a white woman from Kansas. I was raised with the help of a white grandfather who survived a Depression to serve in Patton’s Army during World War II and a white grandmother who worked on a bomber assembly line at Fort Leavenworth while he was overseas. I’ve gone to some of the best schools in America and lived in one of the world’s poorest nations. I am married to a black American who carries within her the blood of slaves and slaveowners – an inheritance we pass on to our two precious daughters. I have brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, uncles and cousins, of every race and every hue, scattered across three continents, and for as long as I live, I will never forget that in no other country on Earth is my story even possible. It’s a story that hasn’t made me the most conventional candidate. But it is a story that has seared into my genetic makeup the idea that this nation is more than the sum of its parts – that out of many, we are truly one. Throughout the first year of this campaign, against all predictions to the contrary, we saw how hungry the American people were for this message of unity. Despite the temptation to view my candidacy through a purely racial lens, we won commanding victories in states with some of the whitest populations in the country. In South Carolina, where the Confederate Flag still flies, we built a powerful coalition of African Americans and white Americans. This is not to say that race has not been an issue in the campaign. At various stages in the campaign, some commentators have deemed me either “too black” or “not black enough.” We saw racial tensions bubble to the surface during the week before the South Carolina primary. The press has scoured every exit poll for the latest evidence of racial polarization, not just in terms of white and black, but black and brown as well. And yet, it has only been in the last couple of weeks that the discussion of race in this campaign has taken a particularly divisive turn. On one end of the spectrum, we’ve heard the implication that my candidacy is somehow an exercise in affirmative action; that it’s based solely on the desire of wide-eyed liberals to purchase racial reconciliation on the cheap. On the other end, we’ve heard my former pastor, Reverend Jeremiah Wright, use incendiary language to express views that have the potential not only to widen the racial divide, but views that denigrate both the greatness and the goodness of our nation; that rightly offend white and black alike. I have already condemned, in unequivocal terms, the statements of Reverend Wright that have caused such controversy. For some, nagging questions remain. Did I know him to be an occasionally fierce critic of American domestic and foreign policy? Of course. Did I ever hear him make remarks that could be considered controversial while I sat in church? Yes. Did I strongly disagree with many of his political views? Absolutely – just as I’m sure many of you have heard remarks from your pastors, priests, or rabbis with which you strongly disagreed. But the remarks that have caused this recent firestorm weren’t simply controversial. They weren’t simply a religious leader’s effort to speak out against perceived injustice. Instead, they expressed a profoundly distorted view of this country – a view that sees white racism as endemic, and that elevates what is wrong with America above all that we know is right with America; a view that sees the conflicts in the Middle East as rooted primarily in the actions of stalwart allies like Israel, instead of emanating from the perverse and hateful ideologies of radical Islam. As such, Reverend Wright’s comments were not only wrong but divisive, divisive at a time when we need unity; racially charged at a time when we need to come together to solve a set of monumental problems – two wars, a terrorist threat, a falling economy, a chronic health care crisis and potentially devastating climate change; problems that are neither black or white or Latino or Asian, but rather problems that confront us all. Given my background, my politics, and my professed values and ideals, there will no doubt be those for whom my statements of condemnation are not enough. Why associate myself with Reverend Wright in the first place, they may ask? Why not join another church? And I confess that if all that I knew of Reverend Wright were the snippets of those sermons that have run in an endless loop on the television and You Tube, or if Trinity United Church of Christ conformed to the caricatures being peddled by some commentators, there is no doubt that I would react in much the same way But the truth is, that isn’t all that I know of the man. The man I met more than twenty years ago is a man who helped introduce me to my Christian faith, a man who spoke to me about our obligations to love one another; to care for the sick and lift up the poor. He is a man who served his country as a U.S. Marine; who has studied and lectured at some of the finest universities and seminaries in the country, and who for over thirty years led a church that serves the community by doing God’s work here on Earth – by housing the homeless, ministering to the needy, providing day care services and scholarships and prison ministries, and reaching out to those suffering from HIV/AIDS. In my first book, Dreams From My Father, I described the experience of my first service at Trinity: “People began to shout, to rise from their seats and clap and cry out, a forceful wind carrying the reverend’s voice up into the rafters….And in that single note – hope! – I heard something else; at the foot of that cross, inside the thousands of churches across the city, I imagined the stories of ordinary black people merging with the stories of David and Goliath, Moses and Pharaoh, the Christians in the lion’s den, Ezekiel’s field of dry bones. Those stories – of survival, and freedom, and hope – became our story, my story; the blood that had spilled was our blood, the tears our tears; until this black church, on this bright day, seemed once more a vessel carrying the story of a people into future generations and into a larger world. Our trials and triumphs became at once unique and universal, black and more than black; in chronicling our journey, the stories and songs gave us a means to reclaim memories tha t we didn’t need to feel shame about…memories that all people might study and cherish – and with which we could start to rebuild.” That has been my experience at Trinity. Like other predominantly black churches across the country, Trinity embodies the black community in its entirety – the doctor and the welfare mom, the model student and the former gang-banger. Like other black churches, Trinity’s services are full of raucous laughter and sometimes bawdy humor. They are full of dancing, clapping, screaming and shouting that may seem jarring to the untrained ear. The church contains in full the kindness and cruelty, the fierce intelligence and the shocking ignorance, the struggles and successes, the love and yes, the bitterness and bias that make up the black experience in America. And this helps explain, perhaps, my relationship with Reverend Wright. As imperfect as he may be, he has been like family to me. He strengthened my faith, officiated my wedding, and baptized my children. Not once in my conversations with him have I heard him talk about any ethnic group in derogatory terms, or treat whites with whom he interacted with anything but courtesy and respect. He contains within him the contradictions – the good and the bad – of the community that he has served diligently for so many years. I can no more disown him than I can disown the black community. I can no more disown him than I can my white grandmother – a woman who helped raise me, a woman who sacrificed again and again for me, a woman who loves me as much as she loves anything in this world, but a woman who once confessed her fear of black men who passed by her on the street, and who on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe.

AND IT GOES ON

09 March 2008

3:55 PM - 1 comment

Dream divisiveness

Can Bill Clinton STOP talking about the dream team

In order for their to be a dream team Hillary has to get rid of the chip on her shoulder and settle for VP. Now with all the mud that has been tossed by the Clintons it will be near impossible for her to do this.

So yeah. Enough.

I don't want to bring race into this but if Obama was down by 139 primary and caucus delegates every single leader in the Democratic Party will be calling him and telling him to take the VP spot, but being that it is the Clintons we will continue slinging mud and dividing the party so that the Republicans can stay in control for any 4 years.

I really don't care who wins the nomination or if McCain wins the general. All I care about right now is the legislative branch. Capitol Hill pass the bills so we need to keep and actually increase the majority in order to make change possible but instead here we are trying to decide which will look better in the history books, a female president who has been in politics for FOREVER, or a black man who smoked pot in high school

Mercy

2:50 PM - No comments

Math

Okay so I have spent tooo much time on CNN playing the delegate game and here are the results.

  1. In order for the democratic candidates to reach 2025 they will either need a rematch in Michigan and Florida or help from the Superdelegates.
  2. Assumption OBAMA: wins Wyoming, West Virginia, South Dakota, Mississippi and North Carolina by at least 20% and that
  3. Assumption HILLARY: takes Penny, Kentucky, Puerto Rico by 20%
  4. Assumption: Indiana, Oregon, Guam, Montana are won by either by negligible differences (<5%>
  5. Hillary will need 287 Superdelegates in order to clinch the nomination
  6. Obama will need 211 Superdelegates in order to clinch the nomination.
  7. Not really sure what Florida and the Michigan votes will do to the math.
  8. Now if Hillary gets 287 that means Obama only gets an addition 70 super delegates out of the 357 left in the field NOT POSSIBLE
  9. So what does this mean, there is no way that Hillary gets the nomination based on delegates without help from the disqualified states (FL & MI).